Crossing the Sound and other #mapmooc stories

Update, Feb 2015: for a map made with Knight Lab’s Storymap JS see The Water of Leith.

The final #mapmooc assignment was to tell a story with a map, to be assessed using peer review.

Aargh, storytelling…what does that mean in this context? Joseph Kerski, who has co-designed the mapping assignments, has written a post on the 15 minute story map, and well, it doesn’t have to be War and peace.

Esri’s Story Maps capability has templates and looks great – see the videos (part 1 | part 2) on the making of Landscape’s greatest hits and the four step process. Trouble is, it’s got time sink written all over it unless you’ve already got everything to hand. Some #mapmoocers have though, and the results are nice if eye candy rather than deep cartography – see Belgrade uncensored | Skopje 1963-2013 | The ruined abbeys of North Yorkshire | A dining/drinking tour of Epcot, FL

Most people used the web app version after Autumn Matthews posted a step by step guide, but I ran into two buglike things (some pics loaded, some didn’t, easy to lose everything in a preview/organise/build dance for some unexplained reason).

There’s a proprietary vs open concern with ArcGIS – for example neither maps or story maps embed nicely in Storify or (I think) Tumblr, so I may as well just add links to some other #mapmoocers efforts here:

Doing my map was a learning experience, ArcGIS being not as intuitive as at first sight. Channelling Warren Reilly’s Galway: how it’s changed (see also Old and new synagogues across Germany) I looked at Crossing the Sound. Rather than repeatedly trying to get photos to load I spent my time looking for a layer to demonstrate topographical change in the area, which felt more faithful to the spirit of the course:

10 points of interest on the Øresund, with a focus on the rise and fall of transport by sea

Crossing the Sound: 10 points of interest on the Øresund, with a focus on the rise and fall of transport by sea

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s