#smwbigsocialdata: getting social at CBS

On 27 February the boffins at Copenhagen Business School (aka the Computational Social Science Laboratory in the Department of IT Management) opened their doors for Social Media Week with Big social data analytics: modelling, visualization and prediction. This was the second time CSSL has participated in #smwcph, with their 2014 workshop (preso) looking at social media analytics. See also my post on text analysis in Denmark.

Wifi access was not offered, resulting in only 19 tweets, but as many of these were photos of the slides I’m not really complaining. Also no hands-on this year, all in all a bit of a lacklustre form of public engagement.

Ravi Vatrapu kicked off the workshop with a couple of definitions:

  • What is social? – involves the other; associations rather than relations, sets rather than networks
  • What is media? – time and place shifting of meanings and actions

The CSSL conceptual model:

model

  • social graph analytics – the structure of the relationships emerging from social media use; focusing on identifying the actors involved, the activities they undertake, the actions they perform and the artefacts they create and interact with
  • social text analytics – the substantive nature of the interactions; focusing on the topics discussed and how they are discussed

It’s a different philosophy from social network analysis, using fuzzy set logic instead of graph theory, associations instead of relations and sets instead of social networks.

Abid Hussain then presented the SODATO tool, which offers keyword, sentiment and actor attribute analysis on Twitter and Facebook (public posts only, uses Facebook Graph API). Data from (for example) a company’s wall can be presented in dashboard style, eg post distribution by month.

Next, Raghava Rao Mukkamala explored social set analytics for #Marius and other social media crises. Predictions (emotions, stock market prices, box office revenues, iphone sales) can be made based on Twitter data.

Benjamin Flesch’s Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) is a tool for qualitative analysis. He has built a timeline of factory accidents and a corpus of Facebook walls for 11 companies, resulting in a social set analysis dashboard of 180 million+ data points around the time of the garment factory accidents in Bangladesh.

The dashboard shows an actor’s engagement before, during and after the crisis (time), which can also be analysed over space (how many walls did they post on). Tags are also listed, allowing text analysis to be undertaken.

Niels Buus Lassen and Rene Madsen then outlined some of their work with predictive modelling using Twitter. You have to buy into #some activity being a proxy for real world attention, ie Twitter as a mirror of what’s going on out in the market – a sampling issue like any other. Using a dashboard driven by SODATA they classify tweets using ensemble classifiers, such as iPhone sales from 500 million plus tweets containing the keyword “iphone” (see CBS news story | article in Science Nordic).

They also used a very cool formula I nearly understood.

Last up, Chris Zimmerman gave an overview of CSSL’s new Facebook Feelings project, a counterpart to all those Twitter happiness studies. A classification of 143 different emotions on Facebook, based on mood mining from 12 million public posts, yikes. “Feeling excited” was the most popular feeling by far. Analysis can be done and correlations made on any number of aspects of the data, with an active | passive axis in addition to the positive | negative axis used in sentiment analysis. Analysis by place runs into the usual issue – only 5% of data has locality data.

Overview slides currently available from the URL below…

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