#edDDI: Digital Day of Ideas 2015

2016 update: #DigScholEd was liveblogged by Nicola Osborne. Keynotes from literary historian Ted Underwood on Predicting the past, a distant reading type approach to digital libraries, Lorna Hughes on Content, co-curation and innovation: digital humanities and cultural heritage collaboration, and Karen Gregory on Conceptualizing digital sociology.

Bumped/rewritten post – see below for brief mentions of #edDDI in 2014 and 2013 and other #digitalhss doings.

From the #digitalhss stable came Digital Day of Ideas 2015 (#EdDDI | TAGSExplorer – see graph) on 26 May, livetweeted, blogged and Storified by Lorna Campbell (@LornaMCampbell), with recordings of the talks to come.

Speakers and outputs:

Other #edDDIs:

#digitalhss in four keys: medicine, law, bibliography and crime, workshop on 12 November 2013, liveblogged by Nicola Osborne:

  • Digital articulations in medicine (Alison Crockford) – ah, the Surgeons’ Hall…seeks to illuminate the relationship between literature and medicine in Edinburgh through the development of a digital reader,  joining together not only the literary and medical spheres but also the rapidly expanding field of the digital and the medical humanities; interesting points on the nature of digihum and public engagement issues, see Dissecting Edinburgh for more
  • Rethinking property: copyright law and digital humanities research (Zhu Chen Wei) – the entrenched idea of copyright as an exclusive property regime is ill suited for understanding digihum research activities; how might copyright law respond to the challenges posed by digital humanities research, in particular the legality of mass digitisation of scholarly materials and the possible copyright exemption for text and data mining
  • Building and rebuilding a digital catalogue for modern Chinese Buddhism (Gregory Scott) – the Digital Catalogue of Chinese Buddhism is a collection of data on over 2300 published items with a web based, online interface for searching and filtering its content; can the methods and implications of working with a large number of itemised records, bibliographic or otherwise, be applied to other projects?; channelling Borges’ library of Babel 
  • Digitally mapping crime in Edinburgh, 1900-1939 (Louise Settle) – specifically an historical geography of prostitution in Edinburgh; used Edinburgh Map Builder, developed as part of the Visualising Urban Geographies project, which allows you to use National Library of Scotland maps, Google Maps and your own data; viz helps you spot trends and patterns you may not have noticed before;  for locations elsewhere in UK Digimap includes both contemporary and historical maps; Historypin uses historical photography to create maps, (EH4, plus come in #kierkegaard); see also the Edinburgh Atlas

See also the workshop on data mining on 19 November 2013.

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Telling stories with maps: literary geographies

Telling stories with maps: the geoweb, qualitative GIS and narrative mapping (programme) was a seminar (report | another one) held on 30 April as part of Hestia2, a project centred round spatial reading and visualising Herodotus’ Histories (see posts). Sessions in the morning covered narrative mapping while the afternoon focused on literary analysis and networks.

Sessions of particular note:

During the lunch break participants tried out the MapLocal app (Android only), which allows users to take photos and record audio commentaries which are geolocated and uploaded to a shared map. Echoes of the Gdn’s Google  Street View Sleuth?

Time to revisit Kierkegaard in maps, although other personally related themes might prove more doable.

A recurrent theme [was] the conceptual and technical challenges associated with efforts to shift the focus away from traditional ‘Cartesian’ cartographic methods – with their focus on surfaces, images and topographies – onto the topological and networked representations contained in narrative depictions of space.

What is lost in translation from narrative to map or map to narrative form?

Great livetweeting from @muziejus:

A further event on 6 June explored digital pedagogy.

Some linkage:

From #corpusmooc materials on spatial humanities (full post archived):

Some notes:

  • literary cartography
    • an approach using a symbolic language
    • spatial elements of texts are translated into cartographic symbols
    • allows new ways in exploring and analysing the geography of literature
    • tools of interpretation – show something which hasn’t been seen before
    • not just supporting the text
  • the space of fiction – categories
    • settings – where the action takes place (house, village)
    • zones of action – several settings combined (city, region)
    • projected spaces
      • characters are not present but are thinking of, remembering, longing for or imagining a specific place
    • markers – places which are mentioned; indicate the geographical range and horizon of a fictional space
    • paths/routes – along which characters move; connections between waypoints (settings, projected spaces)
  • database support
    • data model
      • general text information, including bibliography and assigned model region
      • about the author
      • the temporal structure of the story line
      • spatial objects
    • maps created automatically from database
  • what elements of the literary space can be mapped
    • the city in literature
    • interactions/tensions between centre and periphery
    • travelling
    • crossing borders
    • imaginary places
    • literary tourism
  • what elements are unmappable
  • different representations for epochs, genres?
  • spatial models
    • maps in literature, eg Treasure Island
    • imaginary settings
    • mapping of a single text
    • mapping of groups of texts
      • where and when do cities appear on the literary map of Europe?
      • how international is the space?
    • placing literature on a map
      • simplistic
      • no theoretical foundation
    • issues and uncertainties
      • the artistic freedom of the author
      • semantic and linguistic variation in describing places and spaces
      • vague geographical concepts
      • reading variations by different readers
      • visualisation need to make some things clearer than they actually are
      • texts do not always provide distinct or correct information
      • different interpreters can provide different viewpoints – subjective
      • mark data as direct/indirect reference
      • detail may not be provided of a journey, but a straight line gives the wrong impression
  • maps as an intermediate results, sources of inspiration, generators of ideas for future research
    • makes aspects visible which were invisible before
    • creates knowledge about places, their historical layers, meanings, functions and symbolic values